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NEW RELEASE: Kirakos Gandzaketsi's History of the Armenians

Kirakos Gandzaketsi's History of the Armenians is a primary source for the study of the Armenian highlands in the 13th century. This lengthy work, which has survived in 65 chapters, is divided thematically into sections. Part I is a summary of Armenian church and political history from C4th to 12th. Part II describes political and military events in the 12thcentury, both...

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Ghewond

Ghewond by Karekin Zarbanalian (1865) Although our chronicles do not provide definitive information about the span of Ghewond’s life, it is clear that he lived as an eyewitness to events taking place in the late 8th century.             His History, which has made it down to us, describes the Muslim conquest of Armenia of the 7th-8th centuries. There is no mention...

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Aristakes Lastivertc'i

Aristakes Lastivertc'i by Karekin Zarbanalian (1865) Aristakes Lastivertc'i can be considered as preeminent among Armenian authors of the 11th century, although we do not have any biographical information whatsoever about him. We can only say from his discourse and literary style that he appeared to be a cleric, and that he displayed ample knowledge of the Holy Scripture: For everything...

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Ghazar P'arpec'i

Ghazar P'arpec'i by Karekin Zarbanalian (1865)   Ghazar P’arpec’i flourished at the end of the fifth and the beginning of the sixth century. It was a miserable period, after the dissolution of the Arsacid throne, when Armenia was under the political rule of the marzbans. Discord had started to rear its ugly head among the nakharars, putting the country in...

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The Maxims and Wisdom of Khikar & Volume 2 of Smbat Sparapet's Chronicle

We are excited to announce our forthcoming publication of The Maxims and Wisdom of Khikar and Volume 2 of Smbat Sparapet's Chronicle as part of our growing Dual Language Series. These titles will be published on December 1, 2021. The Maxims and Wisdom of Khikar. Among the first works ever translated into Classical Armenian, The Maxims and Wisdom of Khikar has had a resounding influence on Armenian authors...

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Prohaeresius and the Missing Source

In his last novella, Raffi takes the reader to late antiquity to introduce the Armenian philosopher and 4thcentury Athens’ leading professor of rhetoric, Prohaeresius. Part biography and part historical fiction, the plot of the book bends the rules of time to imagine a meeting between Prohaeresius and Movses Xorenats’i (“The Father of Armenian Literature”), in which Movses implores Prohaeresius to...

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Dual Language Series Now in Paperback!

We are excited to announce that our growing Dual Language Series will soon be available in paperback. Our Dual Language Series, containing the greatest works of antique and medieval Armenian literature, places the original Classical Armenian (Grabar) text and the corresponding English translation side-by-side. The following paperbacks will be published on October 26, 2021 and are available for preorder now. Aristakes Lastivertc'i's History. Aristakes Lastiverts’i was an...

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7th & 8th Century Gems

We are excited to announce our forthcoming publication of Sebeos and Ghevond’s Histories. These key 7th-8th century historical sources continue our Dual Language Series, which places the original Armenian text on the left-hand side and the corresponding English translation on the right-hand side, and will be published on July 13, 2021. Sebeos' History is a seventh century document of special...

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The History of Tamerlane and His Successors

We are excited to announce our forthcoming publication of The History of Tamerlane and His Successors. This release continues our Dual Language Series, which places the original Armenian text on the left-hand side and the corresponding English translation on the right-hand side, and will be published on July 13, 2021. The History of Tamerlane begins with the devastations wreaked on the district...

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On the Chinese Origin of the Mamikonian Clan

The Mamikonian name is among the most beloved in Armenian history, due largely to the heroic role of its 5th century leader, Vartan, as the Armenian general in the Battle of Avarayr. Yet the Mamikonians were also the most powerful princely family in Armenian affairs for many centuries, rivaling even the king in influence. So it often comes as a surprise...

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Smbat Sparapet’s Letter to King Henry I of Cyprus

The author of the History of the Tartars, Het’um the Historian, was the nephew of King Het’um I and Smbat Sparapet (commander-in-chief) of the Armenian Kingdom of Cilicia, both of whom were knowledgeable informants by virtue of having made the multi-year journey to the Far East (Smbat in 1247-51, and Het’um in in 1254-55). Smbat described some of his observations...

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The 1,570th Anniversary of the Battle of Avarayr

This year marks the 1,570th anniversary of the Battle of Avarayr, which the Armenian Church commemorates every year with the Feasts of Sts. Ghevontiants and Vartanants on the Tuesday and Thursday preceding Great Lent. The Battle of Avarayr was originally described by Ghazar P'arpec'i and Yeghishe, whose Histories will be published next month (together with P'avstos' History) as part of the new Golden Age release...

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Five Gems of Medieval Armenian Literature

We are very excited to announce our forthcoming publication of five gems of medieval literature. The hardbacks are the first releases of our new Dual Language Series, which places the original Armenian text on the left-hand side and the corresponding English translation on the right-hand side.

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Harem

The book that saw the great Armenian novelist Raffi exiled from Persia. It was just before the turn of the 19th century in Persia, some years after Agha Mohammad Khan Qajar—the Shah of Iran and founder of the Qajar Dynasty—marched to Tiflis with some 30,000 troops and fought for 3 days against the Georgians at Krtsanisi. On the third day of battle,...

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